Welcome to AAUW-NJ

AAUW– empowers women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy, and research. AAUW is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that has more than 170,000 members and supporters across the United States, as well as 1,000 local branches and 800 college and university partners. Since AAUW’s founding in 1881, our members have examined and taken positions on the fundamental issues of the day — educational, social, economic, and political. AAUW uses its powerful voice on critical issues affecting women and girls. Join AAUW today!

AAUW’s Mission:
AAUW advances equity for women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy, and research. In principle and in practice, AAUW values and seeks a diverse membership. There shall be no barriers to full participation in this organization on the basis of gender, race, creed, age, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, or class. AAUW’s mission video features members of diverse ages and backgrounds discussing AAUW’s work.

AAUW’s Value Promise
By joining AAUW, you belong to a community that breaks through educational and economic barriers so that all women have a fair chance.

AAUW-New Jersey, a state-level organization of AAUW, recently celebrated 87 years (1927 – 2014). In addition to several statewide events, local branches actively further national and community goals and capitalize on their networking opportunities. The NJ state publication, The Garden Statement, reports regularly on AAUW-NJ participation in public policy, the Educational Opportunities Fund, the Legal Advocacy Fund, and state and local issues.
More…

AAUW-NJ Highlights include:

  • Raising more than $100,000 annually for the Foundation and the Legal Advocacy Fund
  • Scholarships awards to New Jersey women
  • Advisors to the State Department of Education on gender bias and equity issue
  • Working in coalition on state issues affecting women and girls
  • Lobbies for formation and continuance of county commissions on women and for economic equity
  • Sponsor of voter registration drives and candidate forums
  • Community projects for literacy, pre-school ed., child care, and nutrition for pregnant teenagers
  • Initiating state legislation, like the New Jersey Council on Environmental Quality

AAUW-NJ Fall Focus Retreat

Our next retreat in Atlantic City is scheduled for Sunday, October 19 and Monday, October 20, 2014.


Embracing Leadership

MakeTime

Join NY/NJ WILD PROJECT (Women In Leadership Development) in our first-ever joint leadership read via conference call.

Mark the 3rd Tuesday of each month for the monthly discussion of the book, “Leadership the Eleanor Roosevelt Way” by Robin Gerber.

Project begins July 15th, 2014 @ 7pm. Lots of ways to participate – individual/buddy system/team approach. Gather a friend or two (or three) and share the conversation.

Robin Gerber suggested the ‘drop in’ model – sign up for the chapter/s that you are most interested in. Contact Joan Monk to join the conversation: ftmaven@gmail.com or 914-245-7704.

See flyer!

Reading group guide

CELEBRATING WOMEN AND GIRLS

BirthdayCakeHappy Birthday Eleanor – October 11

In 2012 the United Nations designated October 11, Eleanor’s birthday, to celebrate the International Day of the Girl.

Since 1975 the UN began observing International Women’s Day on March 8 worldwide.

Using the time frame, October 11 through March 8, you can design your own CELEBRATION HONORING WOMEN AND GIRLS. 

Below is detailed information to assist you in your planning:

A.  Background Information on International Day of the Girl
B.  The Girl Effect
C.  Create an Eleanor Roosevelt Birthday Club
D.  Get Girls Involved in National Model UN – NMUN Conferences
E.  Get Girls Involved in Leadership
F.  Let’s Hear It For The Girls – 11 Girls Everyone Should Know!
G.  11 Days/Weeks/Months of Action in honor of ER & International Day of the Girl*
H.  Primer on Girls Issues*
I.   Individual/Personal Plan of Action
J.   Branch Plan of Action to Honor Eleanor/Celebrate International Day of the Girl
K.  11 Additional Resources


Advancing Equity for Women and Girls through
Advocacy, Education, Philanthropy, and Research

logoltwhiteAAUW is a non-profit & non-partisan political organization that advocates on public policy issues that affect women. Issue advocacy is not just about AAUW lending its name to an issue, or speaking up on Capitol Hill. Issue advocacy is about AAUW members and all citizens concerned with equity being knowledgeable and aware of the current status of important issues. For example: AAUW lobbied for women’s voting rights as early as 1913. AAUW has been empowering women since 1881.

Civil Rights

AAUW advocates equality, individual rights, and social justice for a diverse society.
Affirmative Action
Federal Judicial Nominations
Hate Crimes Prevention
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Issues
Reproductive Rights

Economic Security

AAUW advocates for all women to achieve economic self-sufficiency.
Work/Life Balance (flextime)
Pay Equity
Retirement Security
Health Care

Education

AAUW supports a strong system of public education that promotes gender fairness, equity, and diversity.
Career and Technical Education
Disabilities
Education and Training in Welfare/TANF
Higher Education
No Child Left Behind Act
School Vouchers (but not to private schools)
Single-Sex Education
Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Education

Title IX

AAUW supports vigorous enforcement of Title IX and all other civil rights laws pertaining to education.
Title IX

Equity in School Athletics
Freedom from Sexual Harassment/Bullying
Single-Sex Education

Healthcare

The American Association of University Women (AAUW) believes that everyone is entitled to health care that is high-quality, affordable, and easily accessible.


STEM for girls focus of TeenTech at Georgian Court

by Francesca Cocchi

Georgian Court University sponsors teentech, a program that connects girls with science and technology. Samantha Aries (left), a technologist at International Flavors and Fragrances in Hazlet, teaches students about the chemistry of chocolate - May 29, 2014-Lakewood, NJ. (Photo: Staff photographer/Bob Bielk/Asbury Park Press )

Georgian Court University sponsors teentech, a program that connects girls with science and technology. Samantha Aries (left), a technologist at International Flavors and Fragrances in Hazlet, teaches students about the chemistry of chocolate – May 29, 2014-Lakewood, NJ. (Photo: Staff photographer/Bob Bielk/Asbury Park Press )

Confection chemist Samantha Arias slammed a tray with chocolate-filled wells against a desk — the move loosens the air bubbles, she explained to about 15 high school girls visiting Georgian Court University recently.

Downstairs, another group chuckled as they examined samples of their own saliva mixed with an energy drink under the instruction of Associate Biology Professor Carolyn Bergman for a session on DNA, fingerprinting and blood typing.

The lessons were very different, but the instructors said both had their roots in chemistry.

“I never knew that there was so much chemistry (in chocolate making),” said Molly Nadeau, 17, of Rockaway, a junior who says she’s one of the only female students in her woodshop and electricity classes at Morris Knolls High School. She said she’s considering chemistry as a major after the syrupy-sweet lesson.

TeenTech 2014, a day of hands-on technology workshops for girls in grades 9, 10 and 11 sponsored by the American Association of University Women-New Jersey and Georgian Court University, featured sessions on forsensic technology, sundials, cocoa science, large-scale technology problems and data visualization as well as an animation, print and multimedia workshop for educators and chaperones. About 120 girls from 11 schools attended the May 29 event, which has been held at different colleges for 15 years.

“It’s important for us to have an event like this,” Nadeau said, noting that males are not the only ones in science-related fields. “It’s really encouraging.”

Arias, who is an applications technologist for sweet and dairy at International Flavors and Fragrances in Union Beach, highlighted what she considers the value of TeenTech.

“(The students) get to learn that there is way more to science than what’s in the lab,” Arias said. “You can do virtually anything with your science degree.”

Women represent just 24 percent of the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) workforce, but earn on average 33 percent more when they work in STEM fields, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce’s 2011 Women in STEM: A Gender Gap to Innovation report.

New Jersey’s AAUW President Sally Goodson of Nutley said the nonprofit organization’s goal is to empower women and foster equity and leadership skills. Goodson said TeenTech serves as AAUW’s cornerstone program, informing young women about valuable STEM job opportunities that can ultimately help close the pay gap between men and women and increase equality in the workforce.

For high school girls like those attending TeenTech, “the choices are now,” Goodson said. The retired mother and grandmother advises students to keep STEM classes in the mix so that they don’t narrow their education and eliminate future possibilities.

NJ’s AAUW Vice President of Programming Carol Cohen said the organization has grown through college connections. Treasurer Karen Brown said the TeenTech organizers had to turn away interested high schools once maximum capacity was reached.

BEHIND THE NEWS

Women represent just 24 percent of the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) workforce, but earn on average 33 percent more when they work in STEM fields.

U.S. Department of Commerce’s 2011 Women in STEM: A Gender Gap to Innovation report


Jefferson Township High School, Morris County, NJ
Human Sex Trafficking and the Super Bowl 2014


NEW! The NJ State Legislative Tracking Tool

AAUW of New Jersey now has a state-of-the-art legislative tracking tool that gives us an up-to-date snapshot of pending NJ State Legislation. Follow the links from this report to become informed about proposed NJ legislation affecting women’s issues. Investigating these matters will help our organization take effective and timely action on policy issues in our state.


Graduating to a Pay Gap

PayGapGraduating to a Pay Gap: The Earnings of Women and Men One Year after College Graduation explores the earnings difference between female and male college graduates who are working full time one year after graduation. More info…


The Simple Truth About the Pay Gap (2014)

simple-truth-web-image_2014-280x170AAUW has updated the research report: The Simple Truth About the Gender Pay Gap with new numbers and graphics.

In this commonsense guide about the gender pay gap, AAUW breaks down the latest research into key, straightforward facts, including:

  • state by state rankings of the pay gap
  • the pay gap by age, race/ethnicity, and education
  • guidance for women facing workplace discrimination
  • resources for fair pay advocates

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